Representation, Remembrance and the Memorial (RRM) is a visual arts research project that concerns the Australian frontier wars and the possibility of representing the magnitude of Indigenous loss and survival in a national memorial. This is an Australia Research Council grant.

FORUM 2018: Delegates


NB: More delegate details coming soon

  Savina Sirik   Since 2004, Ms Sirik has worked for the  Document Center of Cambodia (DC-Cam) , an organisation working to secure the memory of the Khmer Rouge period and to seek justice for genocide survivors. Ms Sirik will share her wealth of experience, from working at a community level with genocide survivors, to liaising with international stakeholders to secure support for memorial projects. Currently the DC-Cam are developing the  Sleuk Rith Institute , a major complex in Phnom Penh, that will be a memorial and international centre for genocidal studies.   

Savina Sirik

Since 2004, Ms Sirik has worked for the Document Center of Cambodia (DC-Cam), an organisation working to secure the memory of the Khmer Rouge period and to seek justice for genocide survivors. Ms Sirik will share her wealth of experience, from working at a community level with genocide survivors, to liaising with international stakeholders to secure support for memorial projects. Currently the DC-Cam are developing the Sleuk Rith Institute, a major complex in Phnom Penh, that will be a memorial and international centre for genocidal studies.

 

  Gail Ridgely   Of the Northern Arapaho Tribe of the Wind River Reservation, Mr. Ridgely is a descendant of those who survived the horrific events of the 1864 Sand Creek Massacre, USA, when hundreds of Arapaho and Cheyenne peoples were murdered by US Cavalry troops. Along with representatives from Southern Arapaho, Northern Cheyenne and Southern Cheyenne tribes, Mr Ridgely continues to work with the National Parks Service in developing the  Sand Creek Massacre National Historic Site . Opened in 2007, the site honours those killed in 1864 and pays respects to their descendants.   

Gail Ridgely

Of the Northern Arapaho Tribe of the Wind River Reservation, Mr. Ridgely is a descendant of those who survived the horrific events of the 1864 Sand Creek Massacre, USA, when hundreds of Arapaho and Cheyenne peoples were murdered by US Cavalry troops. Along with representatives from Southern Arapaho, Northern Cheyenne and Southern Cheyenne tribes, Mr Ridgely continues to work with the National Parks Service in developing the Sand Creek Massacre National Historic Site. Opened in 2007, the site honours those killed in 1864 and pays respects to their descendants.

 

  Shiraz Bayjoo   London-based artist currently working in the Indian Ocean region, Mr Bayjoo's practice spans painting, photography, and video. Originally from Mauritius, he studied at the University of Wales Institute, Cardiff. He was artist in residence at Whitechapel Art Gallery during 2011, and has exhibited with Tate Britain, and is a recipient of the Gasworks fellowship. Bayjoo's works investigate the legacies of European colonialism, ideas of nationhood and identity in a post-colonial world, through using photographs and artefacts stored in public and personal archives.   

Shiraz Bayjoo

London-based artist currently working in the Indian Ocean region, Mr Bayjoo's practice spans painting, photography, and video. Originally from Mauritius, he studied at the University of Wales Institute, Cardiff. He was artist in residence at Whitechapel Art Gallery during 2011, and has exhibited with Tate Britain, and is a recipient of the Gasworks fellowship. Bayjoo's works investigate the legacies of European colonialism, ideas of nationhood and identity in a post-colonial world, through using photographs and artefacts stored in public and personal archives.

 

 
  Greg Lehman    Descendant of the Trawulwuy people of North East Tasmania, Lehman recently completed a PhD in Art History at the University of Tasmania, and a Masters degree in the History of Art and Visual Cultures from Oxford University.  Dr Lehman is a member of the National Museum of Australia’s Indigenous Reference Group and is currently working with MONA (Museum of Old and New Art) and the Macquarie Point Development Corporation on the re-development of Macquarie Point, Hobart, into a Truth and Reconciliation Park, that acknowledges and celebrates Tasmania's Aboriginal history. In 2018 he is curating a major touring exhibition, ‘ The National Picture: Art of Tasmania’s Black War ’ at the National Gallery of Australia, and his libretto for the oratorio ‘A Tasmanian Requiem’ will premier at Hobart’s Theatre Royal.   

Greg Lehman

Descendant of the Trawulwuy people of North East Tasmania, Lehman recently completed a PhD in Art History at the University of Tasmania, and a Masters degree in the History of Art and Visual Cultures from Oxford University.  Dr Lehman is a member of the National Museum of Australia’s Indigenous Reference Group and is currently working with MONA (Museum of Old and New Art) and the Macquarie Point Development Corporation on the re-development of Macquarie Point, Hobart, into a Truth and Reconciliation Park, that acknowledges and celebrates Tasmania's Aboriginal history. In 2018 he is curating a major touring exhibition, ‘The National Picture: Art of Tasmania’s Black War’ at the National Gallery of Australia, and his libretto for the oratorio ‘A Tasmanian Requiem’ will premier at Hobart’s Theatre Royal.

 

  Marcia Langton    Associate Provost at the University of Melbourne, and descendant of the Yiman people in Queensland, Professor Langton is the mentor for the ARC project 'Representation, Remembrance and the Memorial'. One of the most significant voices in public debate on many issues relating to Indigenous Australia, she gave the 2012 Boyer Lectures, “The Quiet Revolution: Indigenous People and the Resources Boom” on ABC Ratio National, and was a member on the Expert Panel on Constitutional Recognition of Indigenous Australians. Professor Langton is an anthropologist and geographer, and since 2000 has held the Foundation Chair of Australian Indigenous Studies at the University of Melbourne. She has produced a large body of knowledge in the areas of political and legal anthropology, Indigenous agreements and engagement with the minerals industry, and Indigenous culture and art.   

Marcia Langton

Associate Provost at the University of Melbourne, and descendant of the Yiman people in Queensland, Professor Langton is the mentor for the ARC project 'Representation, Remembrance and the Memorial'. One of the most significant voices in public debate on many issues relating to Indigenous Australia, she gave the 2012 Boyer Lectures, “The Quiet Revolution: Indigenous People and the Resources Boom” on ABC Ratio National, and was a member on the Expert Panel on Constitutional Recognition of Indigenous Australians. Professor Langton is an anthropologist and geographer, and since 2000 has held the Foundation Chair of Australian Indigenous Studies at the University of Melbourne. She has produced a large body of knowledge in the areas of political and legal anthropology, Indigenous agreements and engagement with the minerals industry, and Indigenous culture and art.

 

  Annie E. Coombes    Founding Director of the  Peltz Gallery , School of Arts and Professor of Material and Visual Culture in the Department of History of Art, Birkbeck, University of London, Professor Coombes is a cultural historian specialising in the history and culture of British colonialism and its legacy in the present, particularly in Africa. She has produced key publications that investigate contemporary state and community-led memorial projects and museum approaches to difficult histories, including  History After Apartheid: Visual Culture and Public Memory in Democratic South Africa  (2003) and more recently co-authored  Managing Heritage, Making Peace: History, Identity and Memory in Contemporary Kenya  (2013). Professor Coombes also contributes to memorial projects and is currently an Expert Advisor to the African Union Human Rights Memorial Project (African Union and Justice Africa).   

Annie E. Coombes

Founding Director of the Peltz Gallery, School of Arts and Professor of Material and Visual Culture in the Department of History of Art, Birkbeck, University of London, Professor Coombes is a cultural historian specialising in the history and culture of British colonialism and its legacy in the present, particularly in Africa. She has produced key publications that investigate contemporary state and community-led memorial projects and museum approaches to difficult histories, including History After Apartheid: Visual Culture and Public Memory in Democratic South Africa (2003) and more recently co-authored Managing Heritage, Making Peace: History, Identity and Memory in Contemporary Kenya (2013). Professor Coombes also contributes to memorial projects and is currently an Expert Advisor to the African Union Human Rights Memorial Project (African Union and Justice Africa).

 

 
  Emma Nicolson   Curator and educator whose work in contemporary art is grounded in social context and collaborative practice, Ms Nicolson is the founding Director of  ALTAS Arts,  a commissioning organisation based in the Isle of Skye in north-west Scotland. ATLAS commissions artists’ projects that explore the relationship between artistic practice, place, resources and community, their challenges and their possibilities.  She brings more more than twenty years’ experience working within leading cultural organisations in Britain and Australia.

Emma Nicolson

Curator and educator whose work in contemporary art is grounded in social context and collaborative practice, Ms Nicolson is the founding Director of ALTAS Arts, a commissioning organisation based in the Isle of Skye in north-west Scotland. ATLAS commissions artists’ projects that explore the relationship between artistic practice, place, resources and community, their challenges and their possibilities.  She brings more more than twenty years’ experience working within leading cultural organisations in Britain and Australia.

  Lyndon Ormond-Parker   Indigenous heritage expert at the University of Melbourne, Dr Ormond-Parker was born in Darwin and is of Alyawarr decent from the Barkly tablelands region of the Northern Territory. He is an adviser on repatriation to governments, museums and Aboriginal communities and has documented and catalogued ancestral remains and cultural artefacts in Australia and overseas.  Dr Ormond-Parker is currently a member of the Australian Heritage Council,  and also a member of the Advisory Committee for Indigenous Repatriation, Ministry for the Arts, who are currently working on the longer-term objective, that all ancestral remains (Australian Indigenous human remains), provenanced only to Australia, should be cared for in a  National Resting Place . 

Lyndon Ormond-Parker

Indigenous heritage expert at the University of Melbourne, Dr Ormond-Parker was born in Darwin and is of Alyawarr decent from the Barkly tablelands region of the Northern Territory. He is an adviser on repatriation to governments, museums and Aboriginal communities and has documented and catalogued ancestral remains and cultural artefacts in Australia and overseas.  Dr Ormond-Parker is currently a member of the Australian Heritage Council,  and also a member of the Advisory Committee for Indigenous Repatriation, Ministry for the Arts, who are currently working on the longer-term objective, that all ancestral remains (Australian Indigenous human remains), provenanced only to Australia, should be cared for in a National Resting Place

  James Oliver    Transdisciplinary academic and writer in the Department of Design, MADA, Monash University, Dr Oliver is a Hebridean Gàidheal, from the Isle of Skye (Scotland),  where he continues to work with communities and partners on cultural projects concerning memory and futures. He is also the author and editor of  Associations: Creative Practice and Research , Melbourne University Publishing (2018).

James Oliver

Transdisciplinary academic and writer in the Department of Design, MADA, Monash University, Dr Oliver is a Hebridean Gàidheal, from the Isle of Skye (Scotland),  where he continues to work with communities and partners on cultural projects concerning memory and futures. He is also the author and editor of Associations: Creative Practice and Research, Melbourne University Publishing (2018).

 
  Nelson Abiti   Nelson Abiti is the current Curator of Ethnography and History at the Ugandan National Museum. Abiti is involved in post-conflict community reconciliation activities in northern Uganda, focussing on displacement, post-trauma, and healing within communities through memorials. This year (2018), Abiti and a team of curators from Kenya and Egypt will implement a project 'Road to Reconciliation'. The team, along with the British Museum, are planning a touring community exhibition of South Sudanese refugee stories from camps in northern Uganda. This community exhibition project envisions healing through art, stories, and people.

Nelson Abiti

Nelson Abiti is the current Curator of Ethnography and History at the Ugandan National Museum. Abiti is involved in post-conflict community reconciliation activities in northern Uganda, focussing on displacement, post-trauma, and healing within communities through memorials. This year (2018), Abiti and a team of curators from Kenya and Egypt will implement a project 'Road to Reconciliation'. The team, along with the British Museum, are planning a touring community exhibition of South Sudanese refugee stories from camps in northern Uganda. This community exhibition project envisions healing through art, stories, and people.

  Avril Alba   Dr Avril Alba is Senior Lecturer in Holocaust Studies and Jewish Civilisation and Chair of the Department of Hebrew, Biblical and Jewish Studies at the University of Sydney. Her monograph,  The Holocaust Memorial Museum: Secular Sacred Space  was published by Palgrave MacMillan in 2015. From 2002-2011, she  was the Education Director at the Sydney Jewish Museum where she also served as the Project Director/Curator for the permanent exhibitions  Culture and Continuity  (opened 2009) and  The Holocaust  (opened 2017). Dr Alba was co-Chief Investigator with A/Prof Jennifer Barrett and Professor Dirk Moses on the ARC Linkage Project Australian Holocaust Memory, Human Rights and the Contemporary Museum which supported the development of the permanent exhibition  The Holocaust and Human Rights  (opened 2018).

Avril Alba

Dr Avril Alba is Senior Lecturer in Holocaust Studies and Jewish Civilisation and Chair of the Department of Hebrew, Biblical and Jewish Studies at the University of Sydney. Her monograph, The Holocaust Memorial Museum: Secular Sacred Space was published by Palgrave MacMillan in 2015. From 2002-2011, she  was the Education Director at the Sydney Jewish Museum where she also served as the Project Director/Curator for the permanent exhibitions Culture and Continuity (opened 2009) and The Holocaust (opened 2017). Dr Alba was co-Chief Investigator with A/Prof Jennifer Barrett and Professor Dirk Moses on the ARC Linkage Project Australian Holocaust Memory, Human Rights and the Contemporary Museum which supported the development of the permanent exhibition The Holocaust and Human Rights (opened 2018).

  Fabri Blacklock    Decendent of the Nucoorilma/Ngaraba people of the Tingha and Glen Innes and Biripi people from Dingo Creek (NSW) with Scottish and English ancestry, Dr Fabri Blacklock is an academic, artist, curator and educator based at the University of New South Wales Art and Design. Dr Blacklock is passionate about improving equity within education for Aboriginal peoples. In 2014, she graduated with a PhD from the University of Western Sydney, that involved recording oral histories with her Elders as well as documenting her family’s artworks and the stories behind them. Dr. Blacklock is a member of the Myall Creek Memorial Committee, aiming to acknowledge and raise recognition across Australia of the nationwide massacres of Aboriginal peoples and the continued impacts of colonisation.

Fabri Blacklock

Decendent of the Nucoorilma/Ngaraba people of the Tingha and Glen Innes and Biripi people from Dingo Creek (NSW) with Scottish and English ancestry, Dr Fabri Blacklock is an academic, artist, curator and educator based at the University of New South Wales Art and Design. Dr Blacklock is passionate about improving equity within education for Aboriginal peoples. In 2014, she graduated with a PhD from the University of Western Sydney, that involved recording oral histories with her Elders as well as documenting her family’s artworks and the stories behind them. Dr. Blacklock is a member of the Myall Creek Memorial Committee, aiming to acknowledge and raise recognition across Australia of the nationwide massacres of Aboriginal peoples and the continued impacts of colonisation.